Best Board Games to Play During the Quarantine

With the city on lockdown, there’s no better way to battle cabin fever and stave off the boredom than by connecting with your family or roommates over some quality board games. If you’re wondering what you should play, here’s a list of some of my favourites.

Catan

Number of players: 3-4  

 

This game of trading resources and building settlements is a true classic. There’s a reason why it’s so well known; it’s an excellent game, relying on equal parts strategy and chance. There’s a bit of a learning curve, but you learn new things every time you play, and once you get a grasp of the basics it becomes a very entertaining way to spend a few hours. Each time the game is a little bit different, and there are a plethora of expansions available to ensure you’ll never get bored.




Credit: Medium
Credit: Best Games For Families

Dixit

Number of players: 3-6

 

This charming game is extremely easy to pick up, and is very enjoyable in its simplicity. Players take turns making up a hint that describes one of the delightfully illustrated cards in their hand, while everyone else attempts to find a card in their own hand that matches that description best. Their task is to then pick out the original card from this set of similar cards. There are many ways to earn points, and the game is all about creativity and thoughtfulness.




Scotland Yard

Number of players: 3-6 

 

This exciting strategy game has all players teaming up as detectives against the one person playing Mister X, a criminal on the run. By spending tickets on various methods of transportation, players travel around London, with the detectives attempting to capture Mister X, whose location is only revealed every couple of turns. Both sides are fun to play, with the heart pounding exhilaration of sneaking around as a criminal and the collective energy of teaming up as detectives.




Credit: Meeple Mountain
Credit: The Spruce

Pandemic    

Number of players: 2-4

 

Given the situation we’re in, I couldn’t not include this game in my list. And aside from being very relevant, it’s also very fun. It’s a cooperative game, meaning all players team up to try and defeat the game itself, by taking on a unique role and working together to control infection spread and research cures for different plagues. The difficulty level is adjustable and there’s a heavy emphasis on strategy and teamwork, making it a great bonding experience. 







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Anita is a second year New Media student looking to find some direction for her future in RTA’s most eclectic program. She loves editing videos, overanalyzing media, adventuring through downtown, and discovering new places to eat good food. She can usually be found daydreaming about her next meal or lost in the folds of one of her carefully curated playlists.